Category Archives: Edmonia Lewis

New Edmonia Lewis Video

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It was a real pleasure to be a part of this project by the brilliant cinematographer

Roberto Mighty.

http://mountauburn.org/2017/edmonia-lewis

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Edmonia Lewis Google Doodle Of The Day! How About That?!


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http://time.com/4656108/google-doodle-sculptor-edmonia-lewis/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+time%2Ftopstories+%28TIME%3A+Top+Stories%29&utm_content=FaceBook

Wendell Phillips Born On This Day 1811

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Relief bust of Wendell Phillips by Edmonia Lewis. The original dates from c. 1864. This signed and dated version was carved in Rome in 1871.

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See @wcaleb on Twitter for an excellent selection of excerpts from Phillips’ writings including this passage.

A Bust Of John Brown Recovered

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A nice account of the recovery and history of this important marble bust of John Brown by the New England sculptor Edward (sometimes identified as Edwin) Brackett. He was Edmonia Lewis’s teacher in Boston. His influence on her work is particularly notable in her own heroic busts of figures such as Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, among others.

New Edmonia Lewis Article!

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Really nice piece on Edmonia Lewis (even if I’m not totally objective, of course). Talia Lavin writes so beautifully, and she packs a great amount of information into the article

http://the-toast.net/2015/11/02/the-life-and-death-of-edmonia-lewis/

EXCITING EDMONIA LEWIS DISCOVERY

An important discovery has been made of a Bust of Christ by the Afro-Indian sculptor Edmonia Lewis (1842-1907). It is in a collection in Scotland for which she also created a Madonna and Child With Angels.

A work by her of this name was auctioned in London in the latter part of the 19th-century, but with no illustration and little other information.

For a quick intro to Lewis, her life and career, Google “Marilyn Richardson” “Edmonia Lewis” both in quotes.

Tug-O’-War For Cleopatra Statue

My late father, a history professor at DePaul University, would never have spoken the first words of this article. And a few other particulars of the story are less than accurate, but I am delighted to be able to archive the piece here.

This discovery, which sparked a bit of contention,  led ultimately to a happy conclusion with the Death of Cleopatra restored and displayed at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC. Definitely worth a visit.

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1988-06-20/features/8801090160_1_piece-of-black-history-edmonia-lewis-paint-cans

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TRIB

By Ron Grossman, 20 June 1988

Don`t be fooled by your textbooks’ silence, Marilyn Richardson`s father used to tell her. Black folks have a history, too. We just have to go out and find it.

Last month Richardson made her dad proud. In a storeroom of the Forest Park Mall, she found a long-lost work of Edmonia Lewis, the first black American to win international renown as an artist. It was, however, a bittersweet discovery.

“The Death of Cleopatra,” a life-sized sculpture commissioned for the Centennial Exhibition of 1876 in Philadelphia, was surrounded by last year`s Christmas decorations and paint cans.

Richardson said Frank Orland, head of the local history society, who had led her to the sculpture, told her that the statue needed “renovating” so it could be put on public view. The Egyptian queen’s white marble face and arms were to be redone in flesh tones, her robe in royal purple, she said Orland told her.

Orland, who also was seeking further information on the work, had taken charge of it two years ago, the latest in a string of caretakers dating to the turn of the century, including a racetrack owner, the Navy, the post office and a Cicero firefighter. None of them, though, knew the sculpture`s full story.

Orland refused to comment on his plans or to allow a photograph of the sculpture to be taken. In a phone interview, he said only, “The Queen is not ready to receive visitors.” He added that he would tell his side of the story in a forthcoming pamphlet, “Cleopatra the Great: Statue of Forest Park.”

“I was excited and heartsick both,” said Richardson, a humanities professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “Staring me straight in the face was an important piece of black history which had been missing for 100 years. Only it was …

Digital Public Library of America (DPLA)

I am delighted that my name comes up in this beta project.

  • Provider
  • Digital Commonwealth
  • Owning Institution
  • Digital Commonwealth
Description

Marcus Jones reports on an exhibit at the Boston Athenaeum celebrating Black History Month. Jones notes that the exhibit features photographs of prominent people in Boston’s African American community. Jones interviews Marie Cosindas (photographer) about the photographs. Jones’ report includes shots of the photographs. Jones reports that the exhibit also includes documents, books and artworks representing the African American artistic, cultural and political traditions. Jones interviews Marilyn Richardson (exhibit advisor) about the exhibit. Richardson talks about a display of census documents and artworks by Edmonia Lewis (sculptor) and Allan Crite (artist). Jones’ report includes footage of artworks in the exhibit.   less